You searched for: “all
all (AWL) (pronoun) (no plural)
1. The whole of something, total of; the entire contents of: Joe's two boys drank all the milk that was left in the fridge.
2. Every one of, each of; the whole number of: All of the people had to be checked in before they could get into the aircraft.
3. Everything, every item; the whole quantity: Is that all that you can carry?
This entry is located in the following unit: English Words in Action, Group A (page 4)
(the science of the celestial bodies: the sun, the moon, and the planets; the stars and galaxies; and all of the other objects in the universe)
(a glossary of biological terms about living creatures including plants and all kinds of animal species and organisms)
(a collective term for all organic substances of relatively recent, non-geological, origin which can be used for energy production)
(all of the enhanced units present parts of speeches (when applicable), have definitions for word entries, and clarifying sentences in context)
(dogs are considered to be the companions and best friends of humans and this list of terms will help all of us understand the topics that exist about our canine friends)
(a suffix that forms abstract and collective nouns added to adjectives to show state or condition; added to nouns to show a position, rank, or realm of; all of those who are part of a group or organization)
(ecology is the study of the relationship between organisms and the environments in which they live, including all living and nonliving components)
(here are 14 important words with elements from Latin and Greek sources)
(this is an over-all listing of the special groups of topics listed on this site)
(mathematics is the deductive study of quantities, magnitudes, and shapes as determined by the use of numbers and symbols while every branch of science and engineering depends on mathematics; measurement is the process of associating numbers with physical quantities and phenomena and measurement is fundamental to the sciences; to engineering, construction, and other technical fields; and to almost all everyday activities)
(words exist in all sizes and degrees of difficulty from numerous languages and English continues to churn out new words from the past and the present)
(an exhibition of words that appear in headlines and sub-headlines which all of us should know)
Word Entries containing the term: “all
laugh all the way to the bank (informal saying or idiom), laughs all the way to the bank; laughed all the way to the bank; laughing all the way to the bank
Having made a lot of money; especially, when doing something that other people consider to be foolish: There were those who thought Celeste's investment in the company was stupid, but now she's laughing all the way to the bank.
This entry is located in the following unit: English Words in Action, Group L (page 2)
The love of money is the root of all evil (Timothy 6:10)
This entry is located in the following unit: Bible Quotations used in modern English (page 5)
Word Entries at Word Info: “all
all (adjective) (not comparable)
The entire, the whole; the total amount, quantity, or extent of: "Audy stayed awake all night because of her illness."
This entry is located in the following unit: omni-, omn- (page 1)
all, all, all, awl
all (AWL) (pronoun)
The whole of something; the entire contents of: When Bradley and Roy came home, they drank all the milk that was left in the "fridge".
all (AWL) (adverb)
Every one of, each of; the whole number of: All of the people had to be checked before they could get into the aircraft.
all (AWL) (noun)
Everything, every item; the whole quantity: Come on, Dustin, is that all that you can carry?
awl (AWL) (noun)
A tool for making holes in wood, leather, etc.: The repairman used an awl to make a new shoelace holes for the old shoes.

Gerome used an awl to make all the holes in the lathing for Jill's front porch.

More possibly related word entries
Units at Word Info related to: “all
(Greek: said to be a stem for "all, every, whole", or "complete"; that is, a field of study in biology that refers to the whole set of omics including their -omics and -ome subfields in order to understand life as a holistic existence and organic beings as a whole)
(Latin: all, every)
(Greek: all, every, entire)
(Greek: pancreas [pan, "all" plus kreas, "flesh"; the idea apparently being that the pancreas is an organ composed entirely of glandular flesh])
(Latin: all, whole, entire)
(Greek: different, other, another; divergence; a combining form denoting a condition differing from the normal or a reversal, or referring to "another")
(having a "bird brain" may be a good thing, after all)
(Greek: man, mankind; human beings; including, males (man, men; boy, boys) and females (woman, women; girl, girls); all members of the human race; people, humanity)
(cytology is the study of cells and the cell theory states that all living things are composed of cells and that all cells arise only from other cells)
(Latin: around, about, surrounding, closed curve, circling, circular on all sides; literally, "in a circle")
(Just two of many lexicons that need to clarify all of the word contents for a better understanding instead of using another form of one of the words that is being defined to explain the other entries or simply not providing any information about the other words besides the primary entry.)
(Animal health and dung beetle health: they are both vital)
(Anglo Saxon or Teutonic: in Old English times, eye was eage, which is related to a whole range of words for "eye" in other European languages; including, Greek ophthalmos and Latin oculus [with all of its subsequent derivatives])
(Greek: genein, "to produce"; all the genetic information possessed by any organism)
(mythology for all seasons)
(from the depths of the ocean floors to the highest mountains, from dry deserts to grasslands, and the warm and wet tropical areas; all provide each form of life its preferred habitat)
(of all of those who were involved with the first edition of the Oxford English Dictionary, it was James Murray who made the greatest contributions)
(Latin: human beings, mankind; literally, "man, men"; however, it now also includes, "woman, women" or all of humanity)
(narcoleptics struggle against sleepiness all day long)
(Latin: foot, feet; people often see this ped element in other words. When people refer to "pedal extremities", they mean "feet". When anyone pushes the pedals of a bicycle, it is done with the feet. A pedestrian must use the feet for walking. A quadruped has four feet while a centipede has "100 feet"; or a large number of them because it may be impossible to count all of them.)
(situation in which less and less is done by more and more officials; government agency where after all is said and done, more is said than done)
(an agency where after all is said and done, more is said than done.)
(a form of word humor when people fiddle with words and laugh at the resultant loony tunes: Considered by some to be the lowest form of humus, earthy wit that we all dig and often respond to with groans and moans)
(a form of word humor when people fiddle with words and laugh at the resultant loony tunes; considered by some to be the lowest form of humus, earthy wit, that we all dig and often respond to with groans and moans)
(a process by which nature prevents everything from happening all at once)
(when all roads led to Rome)
(Latin: always, ever, at all times, on each occasion)
(All sporozoa are parasitic)
(Latin: internal organs; all that is under the skin, all parts in the body except flesh or muscles; entrails; any large interior organ in any of the three great cavities of the body; specifically, those within the chest; such as, the heart or lungs; or in the abdomen; such as, the liver, pancreas, and intestines; and in the head; such as, the brain)
Word Entries at Word Info containing the term: “all
A keyring is used for holding all kinds of keys, except the key to success.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
A secret is enough for one, too much for two, and nothing at all for three.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 1)
all mighty, almighty
all mighty (awl MIGH tee) (adverb)
When "all" of those in a group are in agreement, or disagreement, about something: We're all mighty glad to see you again, Gordon.
almighty (awl MIGH tee) (adjective)
Having absolute power; all-powerful: Judaism is said to be the first religion to teach the existence of a supreme deity having almighty power.

Pastor Marcus shouted that we are all mighty glad to know the power of the almighty presence of the Lord.

all ready (awl RED ee)
1. Everyone or everything is ready; quite ready; completely ready: "I was all ready to start my next job."
2. Allocate, assign, grant, provide: "Allow yourself at least an hour to get to the airport."
all ready, already
all ready (awl RED ee) (adjective)
Everyone or everything is prepared; quite ready in every particular; completely ready: Sally was all ready to start her next job.

Helder, Wilfredo, and Nelson will go to the office when they are all ready.

already (awl RED ee) (adverb)
1. By this time; soon: Judy, are you finished with your work already?
2. Before this time: Chris and Zofia arrived at noon but Connie had already gone.

When Chesley arrived, the bus had already gone.

Letty was all ready to go on her trip, but when she went to the bus station, she found out that the bus had already gone and so she had to wait two more hours for the next one.

all right (awl RIGHT)
1. Healthy, in good health, hale, hearty; safe, uninjured, unharmed, unimpaired: "She was all right in spite of her accident."
2. Satisfactorily, acceptably, fair: "The new cake recipe turned out to be all right."
3. Yes, very well: "All right, I will do it just as you want it to be done.
all right, all-right, alright
all right (awl RIGHT) (adjective)
1. Healthy, in good health; safe, uninjured: Joan was all right in spite of her accident.
2. Satisfactorily, acceptably: The new chocolate cake recipe turned out to be all right.
3. Yes, very well: "All right," Joel said, "I'll do it just as you want it to be done".
all-right (awl RIGHT) (adjective)
When hyphenated, this is the spelling for the slang adjective: Jim’s an all-right guy.

This is generally considered to be the only acceptable "exception" to "all right".

alright
This is never an acceptable spelling for "all right"; regardless of how many times you may see it misspelled in print.

Alright, although often misused by many people, it is still considered substandard English!


Alright's Not All Right

By day and night
I sing this song:
"All right's all right;
Alright's all wrong."
—Willard R. Espy

Lee's sister made a new cake recipe which came out all right, then when his niece took the cake to her office, her colleagues exclaimed, "That cake is all-right!".

all together (awl" tuh GETH uhr)
Everyone in a group: "We found the boys all together in the living room."
all together, altogether
all together (awl" tuh GETH uhr) (adverb)
Everyone in a group: When their parents got home, they found their boys all together in the living room watching TV.
The three friends were all together for the whole day.
All together now, everyone, let's sing!
altogether (awl" tuh GETH uhr) (adverb)
1. To the whole extent; completely; entirely: The house was altogether destroyed by the fire.

Some of the constituents were not altogether pleased by the outcome of the election.

2. On the whole; considering everything: Altogether, Meagan was sorry that the accident happened.
3. Informal, naked; nude: When Jorge's mother opened the door, there her little boy stood in his altogether undressed condition.

The garage at the home of the famous skater, Pearce, was altogether destroyed by fire; but he announced that his gold medals were all together in a safe place.

all ways (AWL wayz)
1. All the ways possible; in every way: "She investigated all the ways possible to find her missing sister."
2. The whole way; the entire distance, from start to finish: "He ran all the way home by himself."
all ways, always
all ways (AWL wayz) (noun)
1. Every existing possibility, every method: Angela Brown investigated all ways that were possible to find her missing sister.
2. The entire distance, from start to finish: All ways will be checked by the school staff to see what they need to do to for the poor child.
3. Every method, all possible techniques: The teachers tried in all ways to interest Mary in studying.
always (AWL wiz, AWL wayz) (adverb)
1. Every time, on every occasion, regularly, consistently: The office staff always start working at eight o'clock in the morning; however, their supervisor is always late.
2. Eternally, forever, perpetually: Abelard vowed that he would always love Heloise.
3. At any time; in any event: Jacob was told by the counselor that he could always get another job if he wanted to.

Even though Kimberly believed that she could always get a new job, she found out that she had to explore all ways of getting new employment; including advertising and talking with friends, before she could get the job that she really wanted.

all-right (awl RIGHT)
When hyphenated, this is the spelling for the slang adjective: "He’s an all-right guy."

This is considered to be the only acceptable “exception” to all right.

meandering back and forth and all around *
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 13)
surrounded on all sides *
This entry is located in the following unit: Pleonasms or Tautological Redundancies (page 21)
y'all, you-all, yaw, yaw, yawl
y'all (YAWL) (pronoun)
Used as a contraction of you all: "The waiter came back to where Lynn and Lloyd were sitting and said, Are y'all ready to order?"

"Later, he said, Did y'all have enough to eat?"

"The term, y'all is used primarily in speech in the Southern states of the U.S. to address two or more people."

you-all (YOO AWL, YAWL) (pronoun)
A term often used in the Southern parts of the U.S.: "When Jorge and Heidi went to a restaurant in New Orleans, the waitress greeted them with How are you-all doing?"

"Actually, she might have said, How are y'all doing? which is really the same thing."

yaw (YAW) (noun)
The movement of an airplane, ship, etc., to the left or to the right; especially, an unwanted left or right movement: "Sensors are used to measure the pitch and yaw of the air craft."

"The ship's rudder is used to control yaw."

yaw (YAW) (verb)
To swerve off course momentarily or temporarily: "The passengers noticed that the ship seemed to yaw as the heavy wave struck its side."
yawl (YAWL) (noun)
A sailing boat with two masts and a third mast to the aft [rear] of the two main masts."

The captain of the ship warned his passengers that there could be a strong yaw when the big waves hit the side of the passenger vessel.

In fact, since Jeb was from Mississippi, he said, "Y'all had better be ready for the big yaw that is about to happen to you-all."

Right after the warning, the ship yawed to the right knocking a lot of people on to the floor just as the sailors hoisted the sail on their yawl.