You searched for: “arabic
Arabic
1. A Semitic language of the Arabs, related to Hebrew, and is spoken primarily in Arabia, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and North Africa.
2. Of or relating to Arabia, the Arabs, their language, or their culture.
3. Belonging to, or derived from the language or literature of Arabs.
4. Noting, pertaining to, or in the alphabetical script used for the writing of Arabic probably since about the fourth century A.D., and adopted with modifications by Persian, Urdu, and many other languages.

A distinguishing feature of this script is the fact that etymologically short vowels are not normally represented.

5. A reference to such terms as Arab and Arabian.
This entry is located in the following unit: English Words from Arabic origins (page 1)
More possibly related word entries
A unit related to: “arabic
(words that have come into English directly or indirectly, from or through, Arabic)
Word Entries containing the term: “arabic
Words that have come into English directly or indirectly, from or through Arabic.
This entry is located in the following unit: English Words from Other Languages Index (page 1)
Hindu-Arabic numerals
The number system in use throughout most of the world today, which uses ten digits, including zero.
Units at Word Info related to: “arabic
(Greek > Latin: reed, pipe; the word for "reed" in Hebrew, Arabic, and Egyptian was kaneh; then the word element passed into Greek and Latin, and into the languages of western Europe)
(Arabic: boraq, and Persian, burah [borax]; BORax + carbON; nonmetal)
(Arabic: the gift of finding interesting things by chance; the faculty of finding valuable or agreeable things not sought for; an apparent talent for making fortunate discoveries accidentally)
(Arabic > Latin: alcohol, originally an "essence or very fine powder")
(Modern Latin: named for potash, a compound of potassium; the symbol is from Latin kalium; from Arabic, gilf, and a reference to the charred ashes of the saltwort; metal)
(Modern Latin: from Arabic, zargun, "gold color"; metal)
(Arabic > Greek > Latin: the art of combining base metals [to make gold]; from Greek, chemia, “Egypt”, supposedly where the art of changing metals into gold existed)
Word Entries at Word Info containing the term: “arabic
Arabic days
as sabt (Saturday)
al aHad (Sunday)
al eathayn (Monday)
athalathe (Tuesday)
al arbe'a' (Wednesday)
al khamis (Thursday)
al jum'a (Friday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 1)
Arabic months
yænæyir (kænun æt-tæni)
[kanun ethani or yanayer] (January)
fibrayir (shabat)
[shobat or febrayer] (February)
mæris (azar) [a’thar or mares] (March)
abril (nisæn) [nisan or ibreel] (April)
mæyo (ayyar) [ayyar or mayu] (May)
yonyo (hozæyran)
[Huzayran or younyeh] (June)
yolyo (tæmmuz) [tammuz or yulyeh] (July)
agostos (æb) [ab or o’gustus] (August)
sibtæmbir (æylul)
[aylul or sebtember] (September)
oktobar (tishrin æl-æwwæl)
[tishreen al awwal or october] (October)
novæmbir (tishrin ættæni)
[tishreen athani or november] (November)
disæmbir (kænun æl-æwwæl)
[kanun al awwal or december] (December)

—From Berlitz Arabic for Travellers by the staff of Berlitz Guides;
Berlitz Publishing S.A.; Lausanne, Switzerland; 1989
(those shown above in parentheses).
and from
Spoken Arabic of the Arabian Gulf by “Associated companies,
branches and representatives throughout the world”;
Librairie du Liban; Beirut, Lebanon; 1981
[those shown above in the brackets].
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 1)